Iris van Herpen: “Each impossible thought triggers me to keep on...

As Couture Week started yesterday, we take a look at one of fashion's most unexpected couture designers: Iris van Herpen, who continuously surprises the audience by mixing of 3D printing and intrinsic handcraft. We spoke with the Dutch designer about communicating movement through different technological channels like the Internet, and if we are nearing the point at which 3D printed clothes will become mass-produced and fully accessible.

what we hoped the iWatch could do… illustrated by Charles Jeffrey

"Other smart watches have been geeky and unattractive but Apple has aimed for beauty first, tech second. Unlike previous gadgets it comes in multiple...

Shenkar graduate Noa Raviv’s 3D printed collection shows Israel’s innovative side

Fashion does go beyond the borders of London, Milan, Paris and New York. Israel’s Shenkar College of Design, for example, is ranked as number 15 on Fashionista’s list of best 50 fashion design schools in the world. The beauty of these not-so-conventional fashion cities, is that they don’t have any traditions they tend to stick to. Even in London we hold on to the tradition of breaking the rules and being ‘forward’. In turn, our newness has become a tradition. Now, look at a country like Israel, where engineering and fashion design students are put together to do projects. Where Orthodox and Arabs both walk the streets. Where fashion and technology go hand in hand.