The Gvasalia Effect

Demna Gvasalia may have become a household name overnight, but his younger brother, Guram, is the lesser-known half of Vetements, the world’s most buzzed-about...

Studio Job: Design soulmates

Studio Job, the Dutch luxury design studio consisting of former lovers and dynamic work duo, Job and Nynke, presents the world with a new...

Hostem: the department store that never puts precious product on sale

Hostem is a ‘department store’ like no other. Firstly, its founder James Brown, who is not a 70s funk singer, was a professional football...

Young energy behind old Parisian house Jitrois: Jamie and Annie

On a cozy afternoon, an abrupt phonecall from my editor dragged me from the latest issue of Fucking Young, and 30 minutes later, in the CSM...

Seetal Solanki

Hanging in Hoi Polloi, kedgeree with an espresso martini on the side, casually dressed and cool hair (“I was always a tomboy growing up...

Damselfrau’s masks explore the potential and personality of textiles craft

It’s a typically grim Friday morning in November as Jackson and I head to Dalston. Splutters of rain and gusts of wind contribute to...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Stavros Karelis

Remember Galliano’s first collection, and that of Chalayan? When they were fresh out of Central Saint Martins, Browns bought their entire collections, displayed them in their windows, and became one of the leading institutions to embrace the talent of young designers. Machine-A, the Soho-based store founded by Stavros Karelis, followed the example set by Browns, and has quickly become one of the main globally recognised destinations to sell clothes by recent graduates and that of designers who are still studying. From Astrid Andersen and Nasir Mazhar, to Grace Wales-Bonner and Tigran Avetisytian, Karelis was the first to spot them. But the route to getting there wasn’t a fashionable one at all times, and Stavros’ story is one of extreme dedication and non-stop work. He’s adopted the attitude that separates the wheat from the chaff: not having a day off or a holiday in years. Time is filled with tireless work until the early hours, hosting exhibitions, working together with SHOWStudio’s Nick Knight on projects, and throwing launch parties with Nicola Formichetti. Stavros works as hard as a machine and aptly called his store just that: Machine-A, with the ‘A’ meaning ‘new beginnings’. But, he’s not just a hard-core buyer. More importantly, Stavros has become a sounding board to those emerging designers who he supports and consults. Because, as he says about the stocked garments, “the final result should be absolutely perfect. Better than high-end brands, as you are going to be judged much harder. If you see a fault in a Prada piece, you’re going to think that it’s a production fault. If you see a fault in a graduate piece, you’ll think: “he’s not ready yet”. Courtesy of Dishoom, we met the eloquent and very humble Greek for an extended breakfast, dressed from top to toe in CSM graduate fashion - discussing London, the politics of buying, and what it actually takes to start your own brand.

PR mogul Ed Filipowski on the power of communication

You might expect the co-president of a leading fashion public relations and production agency to have his own office at the end of...

Breakfast With: Anders Sølvsten Thomsen

Anders Sølvsten Thomsen is an unusual stylist in several ways: he only began working in fashion at age 25 and he never finished his degree before being picked up by POP Magazine. A former assistant of Katie Grand, Anders functioned as Fashion Director of LOVE for three years before going freelance in 2014. Residing on the “cheap side of Victoria Park” with his dog and boyfriend, Anders has worked with the likes of Juergen Teller and Sølve Sundsbø, and for labels like Louis Vuitton, Loewe and Nina Ricci, but has miraculously managed to keep his feet on the ground -- we invited Thomsen for breakfast at Dishoom to talk freelance anxiety and how to make it big in the industry.

FASHION CRITIC IAIN R. WEBB HAS BEEN COLLECTING FASHION INVITATIONS FOR...

From the loud to the minimal, the precious to the poor, the fashion show invitation remains as the highly fetishised golden ticket to the exclusive world of fashion shows. A new book, edited by award-winning fashion writer and Central Saint Martins professor Iain Webb, explores this colourful history, functioning as a disjointed but invaluable reflection of the development of fashion and its industry. As the book launches, we asked Webb a few questions about the making of the book and what it might mean when John Galliano sends you a rusty old key with a handwritten label attached.

Work like a Wintour – any advice, Anna?

On Friday, Ms Anna Wintour herself descended from heaven (ed. note: top floors of NYC's Condé Nast building) and sat down with Vogue's newly...

Looking for someone to produce your next creative project?

By Eilidh Duffy -- Earlier this year, the Institute of Contemporary Arts hosted a Friday Salon called Creative vs Commercial, where photographers were urged...