Looking for someone to produce your next creative project?

By Eilidh Duffy -- Earlier this year, the Institute of Contemporary Arts hosted a Friday Salon called Creative vs Commercial, where photographers were urged...

MASTERMINDING MoMu: Director, Kaat Debo on Dries, digital, and how museums...

Kaat Debo is the head of MoMu, that being the deceptively simple shorthand for the Mode Museum in Antwerp. But there's nothing simple about...

What is the future of fashion, Oriole Cullen?

Making my way around a crowd of people queuing for the Alexander McQueen exhibition, I meet Oriole Cullen – dressed in jeans and T-shirt...

The art of interviewing: Sven Schumann and Johannes Bonke of The...

I meet Sven Schumann and Johannes Bonke at Katz Orange, an upscale organic food spot tucked away in a former brewery in Berlin Mitte....

Work like a Wintour – any advice, Anna?

On Friday, Ms Anna Wintour herself descended from heaven (ed. note: top floors of NYC's Condé Nast building) and sat down with Vogue's newly...

Young energy behind old Parisian house Jitrois: Jamie and Annie

On a cozy afternoon, an abrupt phonecall from my editor dragged me from the latest issue of Fucking Young, and 30 minutes later, in the CSM...

Céline-Queen Philo receives OBE

Talking to Love Senior Editor, Murray Healey back in 2003, Céline-Queen Phoebe Philo let on that she'd rubbed up against some "strange objects" in her time:...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Stavros Karelis

Remember Galliano’s first collection, and that of Chalayan? When they were fresh out of Central Saint Martins, Browns bought their entire collections, displayed them in their windows, and became one of the leading institutions to embrace the talent of young designers. Machine-A, the Soho-based store founded by Stavros Karelis, followed the example set by Browns, and has quickly become one of the main globally recognised destinations to sell clothes by recent graduates and that of designers who are still studying. From Astrid Andersen and Nasir Mazhar, to Grace Wales-Bonner and Tigran Avetisytian, Karelis was the first to spot them. But the route to getting there wasn’t a fashionable one at all times, and Stavros’ story is one of extreme dedication and non-stop work. He’s adopted the attitude that separates the wheat from the chaff: not having a day off or a holiday in years. Time is filled with tireless work until the early hours, hosting exhibitions, working together with SHOWStudio’s Nick Knight on projects, and throwing launch parties with Nicola Formichetti. Stavros works as hard as a machine and aptly called his store just that: Machine-A, with the ‘A’ meaning ‘new beginnings’. But, he’s not just a hard-core buyer. More importantly, Stavros has become a sounding board to those emerging designers who he supports and consults. Because, as he says about the stocked garments, “the final result should be absolutely perfect. Better than high-end brands, as you are going to be judged much harder. If you see a fault in a Prada piece, you’re going to think that it’s a production fault. If you see a fault in a graduate piece, you’ll think: “he’s not ready yet”. Courtesy of Dishoom, we met the eloquent and very humble Greek for an extended breakfast, dressed from top to toe in CSM graduate fashion - discussing London, the politics of buying, and what it actually takes to start your own brand.

Reason/Passion: The place of politics in fashion according to Julien David

Born in romantic Paris and trained at Parsons among the cold, spread-sheet towers of Lower Manhattan, designer Julien David established his fashion company in...

Putting Together the Antwerp Six: Geert Bruloot

Geert Bruloot does not sit calmly when he speaks. His hands make great gestures when he talks about the Belgian economy, slavery, or the essence of having a philosophy when deciding to make a career out of fashion design. He switches off his phone when it rings with the same enthusiastic energy as with which he chats. It’s present even when he, every once in a while, pours himself a glass of water, sitting in the top-floor offices of the ModeMuseum in Antwerp, which also houses the Flanders Fashion Institute and the Fashion Department of the Royal Academy of Art. Bruloot, who founded the Antwerp-based shoe store Coccodrillo in 1984, has curated the upcoming shoe exhibition Foot Print, The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion which will open at the MoMu on Thursday 3rd of September. Many real-life Pinterest mood boards with printed images attached to each category stand just outside of the room where our conversation takes place. Asked about which categories dominate the exhibition, Geert explains: “As seven months is really a very short for preparing this kind of exhibition, we’ve tried to work with what we could get a hold of. Technically we needed a longer period for chasing loans from the big museums, and conceptually we had to work hard to convince the fashion houses that their past is equally important as the commercial values they are aiming for today. With more time for profound research, we would have gone through the great historical collections of the world, and would have been able to select older historical and indegenousfootwear that has inspired contemporary shoe design.” With impossible-to-walk-on heels scattered throughout, his moodboards don’t necessarily limit themselves to ‘wearability’. Not that that was the focus, anyhow. “Wearability has never been our first reference. From when we started our shoe store 32 years ago, creativity has always been our goal. When emotion, invention, creation, craft and fantasy can go together with technical development, construction and anatomical research, great fashion creations are born! Shoes can have many connotations: religion, fetish, war, survival, seduction, gender, status, dance, rebellion…”

Simon Horton: Building the Creative Business

In November, we went to a talk by Simon Horton at the 19 Greek Street gallery, where he taught young creatives about how to negotiate their creative fees. We thought everybody could take a leaf out his book, so we asked him to pen a piece full of advice on how to build your creative business, as we know that many students and recent graduates can use a boost about being confident and strong about their work and future. Thank you, Simon, for sharing this with us!

“Life is better than the alternative.” ICA Talks CultureNow! Julie Verhoeven...

"I would hate the thought that I'd have done something irrelevant. Something 'so what'." It was lunchtime and it rained. Julia (van IJken) and I...