Meet one of the most passionate leather artisans in the industry

There are people in this world who live so passionately for their craft it’s humbling. Simone Cecchetto is one of those: a Rome-based leather...

Billy Al Bengston, the 81-year old Muse of Hedi Slimane

It’s been quite the typical British Summer here in London this year come rain or shine, but over in California Billy Al Bengston has no doubt been enjoying the loyal rays of the Sunshine State; he’s even been spending time in the tropical paradise of Hawaii. Al Bengston’s work, both painting and sculpture, is known for its vibrancy. He had his very first solo exhibition in 1958 and continues to work as a successful artist today, residing in his Californian home in Venice, Los Angeles. His work infuses themes ranging from motorcycle imagery to the vivaciousness of the West Coast Pop Scene. We're curious to find the root of his creativity: in which manner did he realise that he had an artistic streak? Was it a case of trying, or rather an exceptionally convenient discovery? Al Bengston reveals to us that he knew his calling by the age of eighteen, and that “in those days it was a passion and not a career.”

Jill Furmanovksy: Capturing the gods of the music industry

The rock and roll era has pretty much ended, according to Jill Furmanovsky, founder of the biggest online database of music photography: Rock Archive....

Nina Donis explains The Rules of Russian Fashion

Russia is not particularly famous for its fashion industry. As designer duo Nina Neretina and Donis Pouppis from the label Nina Donis argue: that’s...

Reading List: Paul Lawrence of November Books

Instagram – it has singlehandedly revolutionised the way in which fashion is communicated (even more so than Facebook dare I say): documenting up-to-the-minute product...

Hostem: the department store that never puts precious product on sale

Hostem is a ‘department store’ like no other. Firstly, its founder James Brown, who is not a 70s funk singer, was a professional football...

A monochrome life: Eugene Rabkin, Founder of StyleZeitgeist

Eugene Rabkin is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of StyleZeitgeist: a forum-eventually-turned-magazine that offers a place for intellectual discussion on avant-garde, slightly obscure, and unknown...

A.F. Vandevorst on why you should take investors as a young...

Whenever young designers expect world fame after their brand has received good press for its first two seasons, it’s always good to keep in...

Putting Together the Antwerp Six: Geert Bruloot

Geert Bruloot does not sit calmly when he speaks. His hands make great gestures when he talks about the Belgian economy, slavery, or the essence of having a philosophy when deciding to make a career out of fashion design. He switches off his phone when it rings with the same enthusiastic energy as with which he chats. It’s present even when he, every once in a while, pours himself a glass of water, sitting in the top-floor offices of the ModeMuseum in Antwerp, which also houses the Flanders Fashion Institute and the Fashion Department of the Royal Academy of Art. Bruloot, who founded the Antwerp-based shoe store Coccodrillo in 1984, has curated the upcoming shoe exhibition Foot Print, The Tracks of Shoes in Fashion which will open at the MoMu on Thursday 3rd of September. Many real-life Pinterest mood boards with printed images attached to each category stand just outside of the room where our conversation takes place. Asked about which categories dominate the exhibition, Geert explains: “As seven months is really a very short for preparing this kind of exhibition, we’ve tried to work with what we could get a hold of. Technically we needed a longer period for chasing loans from the big museums, and conceptually we had to work hard to convince the fashion houses that their past is equally important as the commercial values they are aiming for today. With more time for profound research, we would have gone through the great historical collections of the world, and would have been able to select older historical and indegenousfootwear that has inspired contemporary shoe design.” With impossible-to-walk-on heels scattered throughout, his moodboards don’t necessarily limit themselves to ‘wearability’. Not that that was the focus, anyhow. “Wearability has never been our first reference. From when we started our shoe store 32 years ago, creativity has always been our goal. When emotion, invention, creation, craft and fantasy can go together with technical development, construction and anatomical research, great fashion creations are born! Shoes can have many connotations: religion, fetish, war, survival, seduction, gender, status, dance, rebellion…”

CONVERSATIONS WITH A CRITIC: CHARLIE PORTER

Charlie Porter is British fashion’s wizard of words; his incisive critiques for the Financial Times and his personal website dissects everything from why businessmen...

Studio Job: Design soulmates

Studio Job, the Dutch luxury design studio consisting of former lovers and dynamic work duo, Job and Nynke, presents the world with a new...

Tackling Unsustainable Fashion with Filmmaker Andrew Morgan

Film director Andrew Morgan felt the strong need of tackling the issue of fashion sustainability when a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed in 2013,...