Kim’s Rabbit

Photographer: Nikolay Biryukov Make-up and hair: Marina Keri Model: Virginia Kiss/IMG Models Stylist/producer: Olya Kuryshchuk Clothes: Kim Træger

Roxanne Gatt

Inspired by childhood holidays in the UK, Malta-born illustrator Roxanne Gatt changed directions "abruptly" from studying A-level Maths and Physics to packing her suitcase...

Mixtape Monday: Deadline patterncutting

We know you're all due to finish something so incredibly grandiose, so fabulous that Miucca will hire you and Janet Jackson will write a...

New Waves: Ruihong Harry Xu

Ruihong Harry Xu offers us a fresh take on life within prison: that of life having started right there. This is not Orange is the...

New Waves: Camilla Mecacci

Know that feeling when you see a garment and you're really quite uncertain of how it was made? Camilla Mecacci's BA Fashion graduate collection...

The Royal 20: Marie Maisonneuve

Phone held aloft, I move the screen: pinching and retracting my fingers to explore the environments and experiences of Marie Maisonneuve’s modern nomad. Within...

New Waves: Birgit Frietman

Birgit was born in the Netherlands, but always maintained a strong connection to East Africa via her parents. “When looking for an art and design school, I found it really important that it would be based in a very multicultural city,” she tells us. London seemed like a viable option, and after a short course at Central Saint Martins, Birgit knew she was in the right place. Birgit’s jewellery pieces appear as big wooden structures, almost like actual garments or protective armour; not your average jewel-set of rings and necklaces. They are still precious, however, raised above the conventions of everyday clothing: “What I find most important about jewellery, is that it can be defined as unnecessary,” she says, seemingly cryptically. “Unlike clothing, a person doesn’t need to wear a necklace or a bracelet. Therefore, the wearer makes an absolute conscious decision when s/he puts on a certain piece. The irrelevancy can expose the personal and intimate.” Combine this with an unconventional freedom in use of material, and jewellery seems to be one of the most open forms of practice – its expanded field of conceptual investigation along with an attention to materiality and the wearer. “There’s just one main importance,” she adds; “that there is always a close connection between the body and the piece.” For Birgit, everyday wearability is a not a concern, as long as there is some form of interaction with the wearer. Primarily, she uses her jewellery practice to explore uncommon materials within jewellery.

Kiko Shirahata

What is the best lesson you've learned in CSM?How to express your thoughts through research, develop the initial idea and turn them into a...

Iona’s Egyptomania Jewellery

Iona Judd's twitter alias goes by the name of Shakira, and we're more than convinced that she's up for a little bit of La...

Fernanda Cortés: Objects as a prosthesis for the soul

Forms treading the boundaries of the human and non-human. Characters schizophrenically transitioning from deep mourning to jubilation, and then again into fits of rage....

Ethan O’Connor’s healthy obsession with Ophelia Finke

Now that the world has yet again become obsessed with Calvin Klein's Obsession and Kate Moss' sister, Lottie, has become the star of the...