Damselfrau’s masks explore the potential and personality of textiles craft

It’s a typically grim Friday morning in November as Jackson and I head to Dalston. Splutters of rain and gusts of wind contribute to...

The Chaotic Practice of artist Andreas Emenius

Andreas Emenius is an artist who covers a lot of ground. His work explores figuration and abstraction in videos, paintings, sculptures and performances, and his collaborations with fashion designer Henrik Vibskov and musician Trentemøller see him engage the few mediums he hasn’t explored on his own. We caught him just after the opening of ‘this sticky mess will get us there’ at Nordic Contemporary, a show he curated with Jacob Valdemar, to talk about art and his CSM education.

Can you make art without electricity?

For a student, the notion of putting on an exhibition or event for a public can be problematic. It is the moment where you...

How to survive after leaving art school?

BY DANIEL CHALLIS - After graduation, getting your own studio may seem achievable to some. The cost of living in London is ever increasing...

Billy Al Bengston, the 81-year old Muse of Hedi Slimane

It’s been quite the typical British Summer here in London this year come rain or shine, but over in California Billy Al Bengston has no doubt been enjoying the loyal rays of the Sunshine State; he’s even been spending time in the tropical paradise of Hawaii. Al Bengston’s work, both painting and sculpture, is known for its vibrancy. He had his very first solo exhibition in 1958 and continues to work as a successful artist today, residing in his Californian home in Venice, Los Angeles. His work infuses themes ranging from motorcycle imagery to the vivaciousness of the West Coast Pop Scene. We're curious to find the root of his creativity: in which manner did he realise that he had an artistic streak? Was it a case of trying, or rather an exceptionally convenient discovery? Al Bengston reveals to us that he knew his calling by the age of eighteen, and that “in those days it was a passion and not a career.”

Ilaria Bianchi: Bringing the Italian Job to garbage and waste

The 1980s saw a period of social and cultural diversity in the world of arts and design. From London to New York, Paris to Tokyo, these world class cities became the fertile grounds for a whole new generation that embraced individualism and D-I-Y ethics set against a post-punk nihilism. Critics and scholars alike called this period “deconstruction”, and in fashion this began when Japanese designers such as Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto presented their work in Paris back in 1981. They deconstructed the conception of design and sustainability of that time while focusing purely on form and function (let’s firstly thank the French philosopher, Jacques Derrida, on his scholarly works on deconstruction in 1961). Fast forward to the 21st century, we’re keen to explore the impact that this fashion revolution has had on other realms of design.

Mirko Borsche: Why design history matters and brainstorming sucks

Lunch break at Bureau Mirko Borsche: a handful of graphic designers and interns sit outside in a canopy swing, smoking a cigarette, listening to...

The Dialectics of Beata Wilczek

Artist, curator, scholar, consultant, book-worm -- Beata Wilczek has many titles, none of which describes the Polish Central Saint Martins graduate’s far-reaching practice accurately....

Templates of Cool: Amalia Ulman

In 2014, Argentinian-born Spanish artist and CSM graduate, Amalia Ulman, who is currently based in LA, gained recognition in the art world for her...

Exploring the Internet with Dominik Pollin

For Dominik Pollin, fashion is about images. Images in the sense that to him, fashion is consumed visually, and thus immaterially, rather than through...

Janice Lee and the Face of Luxury Consumerism

Janice Lee, originally from Hong Kong, is devoted to the study and interpretation of consumer behavior. As China’s burgeoning middle class goes on extravagant...

Ami Masamitsu: the strength in fragility

When was the last time that you thought that indeed, there is beauty in functionality? The attentive gaze of the second year BA Jewellery...