Representing the creative future

The Fashion Graduate Diplomas: Grace Son

Yesterday we published an interview with David Kappo, MA Fashion tutor at the Royal College of Art, and the course leader of the Graduate Diploma in Fashion at Central Saint Martins; today we share the last instalment of our recent series, showing the work of Grace Son who based her final collection on the flexibility of cats — a project that perfectly illustrates the current feline obsession of society at-large.

Can you point out one good and one bad memory of this year spent at Central Saint Martins?

A good memory is from the last day of the fabric project in the first term: my class had a group photo for the first time; we were a bit awkward together, but we had fun!

What was the main inspiration for your collection?

My final collection is about the flexibility of cats. I think that their flexibility makes them the most unique creatures in the world. I grew up with cats and the interaction I experienced with them was hugely inspiring. I wanted show how I interpret a cat’s body movements and translate them into a garment. I was especially focused on fabric development to express a cat’s twisted body.

Did your vision or way of working change throughout the course?

I don’t think so. I’ve learned to work more efficiently and flexibly from my very intensive course, but it is about improving, not changing.

What makes your work stand out? 

I always keep questioning myself if I am really happy with the current process of my work or not. If my mind says no, I just stop everything and go back to the first stage, no matter how busy I am. That determination makes me develop my talents and achieve the best results in my work. I always enjoy the 3D work parts, such as draping and fabric development — it’s very challenging but it provides an unexpected approach to design for me.

1 Granary

Magazine Issue 6

With unprecedented honesty and depth, 1 Granary Issue 6 dives into the work and lives of fashion designers today. As a response to the construction of desire and personality cults that govern our industry, the magazine steps away from the conventional profiles and editorials, focussing instead on raw work and anonymous, unfiltered testimonies. For the first time ever, readers are given a truthful insight into the process, dreams, fears, hardships, and struggles of today’s creatives.

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