Representing the creative future

Quarantine Dispatch #2: Designing between Wuhan and New York

As part of our series where we share your thoughts and feelings in quarantine, Parsons fashion student Terrence Zhou puts his reality into words

As part of our series where we share your thoughts and feelings in quarantine, Parsons fashion student Terrence Zhou puts his reality into words

How are you feeling? What are you thinking? What’s happening? Bored, stressed, inspired, uninspired, calm, restless, frustrated, anxious? There’s no “right” way to cope with a pandemic. Reading through these submissions, despite the practical differences of each situation, we felt a reassuring sense of familiarity and gratitude. Maybe you can too. 

 

Terrence Zhou, BA Fashion Design student, Parsons School of Design, New York:

In recent months I faced two painful realities. My home in Wuhan was awash with tragedy and fear. My close family was damaged and lost in unforgiving darkness. That was in early February when I was busy preparing for my final collection. It was hard to ignore what was happening to my city and to my family during that time. I’m glad that Wuhan has relaxed the lockdown and people are back to their normal lives. NYC is ravaged by the coronavirus crisis. Designers and students are suffering. I remember waking up one day and couldn’t help but have a feeling of despair. The number of patients in NY had soared to 200k. Now, more than ever, the physical aspects of my work that link to connection and isolation began to reflect the separation I was facing from my loved ones. My work gives me faith and passion. Being aware of obstacles doesn’t panic me anymore. The importance of understanding and making contact when facing unknown situations is achingly natural. I hope we feel compelled to consider one another, start dropping our barriers and remind ourselves of the importance of being human.

1 Granary

Magazine Issue 6

With unprecedented honesty and depth, 1 Granary Issue 6 dives into the work and lives of fashion designers today. As a response to the construction of desire and personality cults that govern our industry, the magazine steps away from the conventional profiles and editorials, focussing instead on raw work and anonymous, unfiltered testimonies. For the first time ever, readers are given a truthful insight into the process, dreams, fears, hardships, and struggles of today’s creatives.

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