Representing the creative future

Quarantine Dispatch #7: Struggling with depression pre, during and post lockdown

A Slovenian fashion student describes how it feels when others’ isolation lows are your everyday normal

How are you feeling? What are you thinking? What’s happening? Bored, stressed, inspired, uninspired, calm, restless, frustrated, anxious? There’s no “right” way to cope with a pandemic. Reading through these submissions, despite the practical differences of each situation, we felt a reassuring sense of familiarity and gratitude. Maybe you can too.

 

Anonymous, fashion design student from Slovenia

I am a fashion design student and I’ve been experiencing depressive episodes for about two years now. I am just getting a bit frustrated with everything that is happening. I read, see, and hear students complaining about feeling tired and not getting any school work done. Influencers reassure them, saying that it is okay because this is a valid way to feel in a crisis. This is my normal. This is what I have been experiencing before the pandemic. Now I feel even worse. I’ve already been struggling with my degree, it is even harder now. I don’t know if I will be able to finish this year successfully, but I am also trying to stay optimistic. I just wish people would acknowledge that these feelings they are experiencing now for the first time are some people’s normal.

I think there is not enough support for fashion students that experience mental health problems.

As a fashion student, you are meant to be productive and expected to not have much sleep and work extra hard, but suffering with illness makes everything even harder. I believe people are not understanding and think that you are just being lazy, making excuses.

No. I can’t live like this anymore. It’s enough. Please help.

1 Granary

Magazine Issue 6

With unprecedented honesty and depth, 1 Granary Issue 6 dives into the work and lives of fashion designers today. As a response to the construction of desire and personality cults that govern our industry, the magazine steps away from the conventional profiles and editorials, focussing instead on raw work and anonymous, unfiltered testimonies. For the first time ever, readers are given a truthful insight into the process, dreams, fears, hardships, and struggles of today’s creatives.

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