Breakfast With...

Breakfast With...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Ellie Grace Cumming

Ellie Grace Cumming is someone who has always rebelled. At school, this meant wearing a floor length skirt while the other girls hitched theirs...

Breakfast With: Anders Sølvsten Thomsen

Anders Sølvsten Thomsen is an unusual stylist in several ways: he only began working in fashion at age 25 and he never finished his degree before being picked up by POP Magazine. A former assistant of Katie Grand, Anders functioned as Fashion Director of LOVE for three years before going freelance in 2014. Residing on the “cheap side of Victoria Park” with his dog and boyfriend, Anders has worked with the likes of Juergen Teller and Sølve Sundsbø, and for labels like Louis Vuitton, Loewe and Nina Ricci, but has miraculously managed to keep his feet on the ground -- we invited Thomsen for breakfast at Dishoom to talk freelance anxiety and how to make it big in the industry.

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Caryn Franklin

Caryn Franklin is absolutely striking – but that’s beside the point. In 2013 she was appointed MBE for her services to diversity in the...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Hettie Judah

Interviewing another journalist often puts one on edge. After all, these are people so used to being on the other side of the questions...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Elizabeth von Guttman of System Magazine

Whenever the word ‘sustainability’ is mentioned in fashion, a whole vocabulary of earth-shattering terms comes to mind: CO2 emissions, carbon footprint, factory collapses, farmer...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Anja Aronowsky Cronberg, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher at...

This time we are two, Sara and I, who wait at one of the tables of Dishoom King’s Cross to interview Anja Aronowsky Cronberg, editor-in-chief and publisher of Vestoj, the critical, advertising-free, “journal of sartorial matters”. While we comment on how to bring the achievements and vicissitudes of the pair fashion-theory into the dialogue, Anja appears wearing a long skirt, layers of navy, something silky, denim, a pair of glasses, an angular earring in her right ear and a small ring at the top of it.

Breakfast with Shona Heath, the industry’s most celebrated set designer

Behind some of the most magical sets crafted for fashion editorials, shows and stores is one visionary: Shona Heath. Having been at the forefront of...

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Dan Thawley

“I started as a beach suburbs boy…” says Dan Thawley, the Australian-born journalist, features editor of SSAW and Arena Homme + and editor-in-chief of A Magazine, over a fresh watermelon & cucumber juice. After dropping out of his college degree, Thawley moved to London in 2009 in the midst of a (short-lived) modelling and blogging career. It’s here that he met the owners of RA, the former Antwerp and Paris-based shop, and was invited to be their in-house journalist. During that first meeting the managing editor of A Magazine, who just happened to be consulting on the same project, offered Thawley a position as online editor. A year later that same managing editor left – in the midst of making the Giambattista Valli issue – Thawley took over and five years on, he has just wrapped up the Delfina Delettrez issue and is working with the next curator. We spoke to the by now Paris-based and not-so-beach-boy journalist over breakfast at Dishoom.

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Stephen Jones

If Stephen Jones sees people, does he imagine hats on them? The answer is yes, ‘but not a metal Greek Orthodox one on you!’ he says as he pulls up a can of water and pictures it balancing on my head. It is not often that one is being watched meticulously by one of the greatest milliners of our time, over breakfast in Dishoom. Stephen hardly needs an introduction -- he was awarded an OBE for his services to fashion, shared a house with Boy George and Grayson Perry, designed for pretty much any (pop)star and fashion design house that matters; his work can be seen in movies, museums, and even commercials... He just came back from Paris where he’s working with Raf Simons at Dior and we sit down for a conversation and an omelette. When we get talking about publishing, the topic of our second issue comes up and he mentions, “Everybody you ask will have a different perception of digital versus print.”

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Tilly Macalister-Smith

It’s not unexpected when interviewing an interviewer that it begins with talk of recording methods. When I pull out my iPhone and open the recording app, Tilly Macalister-Smith eyes me a little anxiously. She, in turn, dives into her bag, takes out a sunglasses case (did I offend her? Is she leaving already?) and reveals an ‘old school’ (okay, not quite…) dictaphone with earphones: her weapon of choice. Seasoned, safe; guaranteed not to let the odd murmur slip the net with its multiple mics. We sit in Dishoom on a Bank Holiday Monday morning — a place that’s typically quiet, but today, is busy with the hustle-and-bustle of families walking in and out, and chai being regularly brewed. So, the iPhone moves from table to chair, to the seat of the couch on the level above us, teetering at mouth-level. Better to be safe- as Macalister-Smith- than sorry.

Breakfast with 1 Granary: Stavros Karelis

Remember Galliano’s first collection, and that of Chalayan? When they were fresh out of Central Saint Martins, Browns bought their entire collections, displayed them in their windows, and became one of the leading institutions to embrace the talent of young designers. Machine-A, the Soho-based store founded by Stavros Karelis, followed the example set by Browns, and has quickly become one of the main globally recognised destinations to sell clothes by recent graduates and that of designers who are still studying. From Astrid Andersen and Nasir Mazhar, to Grace Wales-Bonner and Tigran Avetisytian, Karelis was the first to spot them. But the route to getting there wasn’t a fashionable one at all times, and Stavros’ story is one of extreme dedication and non-stop work. He’s adopted the attitude that separates the wheat from the chaff: not having a day off or a holiday in years. Time is filled with tireless work until the early hours, hosting exhibitions, working together with SHOWStudio’s Nick Knight on projects, and throwing launch parties with Nicola Formichetti. Stavros works as hard as a machine and aptly called his store just that: Machine-A, with the ‘A’ meaning ‘new beginnings’. But, he’s not just a hard-core buyer. More importantly, Stavros has become a sounding board to those emerging designers who he supports and consults. Because, as he says about the stocked garments, “the final result should be absolutely perfect. Better than high-end brands, as you are going to be judged much harder. If you see a fault in a Prada piece, you’re going to think that it’s a production fault. If you see a fault in a graduate piece, you’ll think: “he’s not ready yet”. Courtesy of Dishoom, we met the eloquent and very humble Greek for an extended breakfast, dressed from top to toe in CSM graduate fashion - discussing London, the politics of buying, and what it actually takes to start your own brand.